China’s lessons

There is an interesting – if unofficial – translation here of Professor Xiang Songzuo of Renmin University’s School of Finance, and former chief economist of China’s Agriculture Bank, December lecture. He starts by saying that China wants private enterprise to flourish but the Politburo seeems to debate rather too often whether private property should be… Read more

Counter-cyclical Job Guarantee or Universal Basic Income as An Economic Stabliser?

A very interesting recent post from Ivan Horrocks leads me to think a Job Guarantee is clearly possible, but it seems to me to be particularly suited for school leavers. For those worried about the country’s lack of work ethic, who, anecdotally at least, so often seem themselves to be in financial services or property… Read more

Localism and control

There is an interesting ‘New Statesman’ article on the renewed, relative, prosperity of  Preston, where, as county town of Lancashire, localisation of expenditure has been a great success. When you think about the success it should not be surprising for it stands to reason that every time you make a purchase at Sainsbury’s the profit… Read more

Continental Differences – again…

Thinking about my legal reflections on Napoleonic Europe, differences are very often about philosophy. This sounds grand but isn’t really. We just need a little more thought. When I worked in France I encountered roadsigns that seemed to me completely doolally. Some pointed across the roads to which they were supposed to indicate the destination,… Read more

The English Civil War and its Ongoing Legacy

I know the English Civil War started in 1642 and ended 9 years later so you’re probably thinking it can’t have much of a legacy now. I just think it might. In the 1580’s the cleric, Richard Hooker, often considered to have written Britain’s first philosophical treatise, ‘The Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity’ wrote  [Book 1… Read more