‘What matters’ is that equality works

We are currently told that Black Lives Matter which, like all lives, of course they do. And while we now discover that the American policeman accused of murder had had 17 complaints against him, none of which seemed to have changed anything, and, indeed there are also instances of American policemen killing white arrestees with… Read more

A Fond Farewell to the UK from an EU27 citizen? – part II (Education, Industry and Media)

Introduction In Part I, I discussed origins, but three cultural and historical differences struck me fairly immediately when I came to work in England in 1981. First, many scientists I met seemed to have little knowledge of the humanities. Correspondingly, knowledge of science seemed lacking among non-scientists. I was hardly the first to notice. C.P…. Read more

Gang culture for toffs? understanding the right wing mind – part three

Sanna Marin, the Finnish Prime minister, who I’ve referred to previously, also has another good quote: I have never thought about my age or gender. I think more about the motivations that brought me into politics. Here is somebody concerned not about her interest group (or ‘gang’), but fired up about why she wants to… Read more

UK Deprivation by Constituency and Voting Patterns in England and NI

Introduction Deprivation and inequality have been regular themes on Progressive Pulse but a very interesting visualisation of deprivation by constituency has been published online by Prof. Alasdair Rae of the University of Sheffield (@undertheraedar on Twitter), displayed in Fig. 1. There is more on the underlying methodology and data here. This is a high-resolution image,… Read more

Normality is the problem

Most will be aware of recent large demonstrations in Chile in favour of greater equality. These often comprised around a million people – a remarkable turnout in a country with a total population of about 19 million. Demonstrators were met with violent military intervention and curfews. The state of emergency has now been rescinded and… Read more

Understanding monetary ‘plumbing’ and where it gets us

There is an interesting podcast from the American site Macro’n Cheese with the Scottish Professor Mark Blyth, who, though he long ago emigrated and has become Eastman Professor of Political Economy at Brown University in the US, he has certainly managed to hang to most of his Dundonian dialect! I have to say I usually… Read more

Westminster: Most Similar Country Ireland? – A new EU Regional Productivity Analysis

Introduction An interesting paper “The big European sort? The diverging fortunes of Europe’s regions” has been published by the Centre for European Reform (CER). Such papers are of great interest at PP. The paper analyses regional productivity. As a single metric productivity is one of the best, but as Charles Adams says, in order to… Read more