Neoliberal lies are certainly present in Brexit too

This was the FT’s front page yesterday (double click to enlarge): I’ll spare comment on Mr Putin’s Siberian holiday… in favour of the second article – an estimate by HMRC that outside the EU it would cost British business 15 billion pounds to fill in time-consuming and inconvenient customs declarations – based on the 215m… Read more

Capitalism’s indebted dynamism

Paul Mason has an interesting article in the New Statesman, which starts: In his own dumb way, Matt Hancock just summed up the survival strategy for global capitalism. Blinking into the camera lights, Britain’s hapless Health Secretary assured viewers that he could promise to build 40 new hospitals with just £100m because “the rest of the… Read more

Organising money and society

There are three (not strictly related) TED talks that are worth highlighting; one by the well-travelled journalist, Johann Hari, another by the social psychologist, Paul Piff and the third by the billionaire, Nick Hanauer. All, I think, are well worth watching and only about 15 minutes each. All I’d suggest, show that we have a… Read more

Rohan Grey’s ‘Banking Under Digital Fiat Currency’ Proposal – A Guest post by Richard Taylor

Rohan Grey, president of the US MMT supporting Modern Money Network, recently wrote a rather good article about why Facebook’s putative Libra currency is a bad idea. In it he links to some proposals for future banking regulation. In my view these proposals for “Banking in a Digital Fiat Currency Regime” are really interesting and… Read more

Selling by the left

I confess I am not usually a fan of Jacobin, which often seems to me, to overstate its case. However there is an interesting article here where I have some considerable sympathy. The article points out the initial joy of the Barrack Obama election success. The author starts: I came to my politics the way most… Read more

The rise of economics as a method of control

This from the Economist of 29 August reviewing an American book, “The Economists’ Hour”, by Binyamin Appelbaum, which I thought historically instructive:. Few economists worked at the Federal Reserve in the early 1950s. Those who were on the staff of America’s central bank were relegated to the basement, at a safe remove from the corridors… Read more